Granny Market Bag. Free Crochet Pattern

If you’re a bag lady like me, you might be interested to learn that I have a new granny market bag pattern in the latest issue of Olann and magazine. (I’m not even going to mention the fact that it’s made of granny stitches, or the fact that I said I’d back off granny for a bit).

Olann and is a fabulous online magazine and it’s completely free! It’s a brilliant and beautiful resource for all kinds of yarny goodness. Whether you’re a crocheter, knitter or an all round fan of fibre and crafts, you’ll definitely find something in there that you’ll like.  I’m coming off like an annoying ad (soz about that), I don’t mean to, honest, I just happen to really like this magazine; the fact that it’s free is amazing. One of my favourite things is that crochet is so heartily included within the issues. No second class status for us hook wielding folk!

Please go HERE, which takes you directly to the pattern.

I wish I’d had the wherewithal to take another picture so you could see its rounded granny bottom. However, fear not! If you pop over to find the pattern you get to see a couple more pics, and another variation of colours with different striping too!

Deirdre and Lora also have a podcast on YouTube that you might fancy checking out. There’s usually plenty of giggles and a good selection of things they’ve made. Thanks go to Fay from the Crochet Circle Podcast for introducing me to them!

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Easy One Skein Crochet Market Bag. Free Pattern

On Monday I began recording a tutorial for the old version of my crochet net bag. Market bags are massive at the minute and, jumping on the band wagon, I hit record and started making. I got a few rounds in when I started to question its construction. It became quite clear that I was trying to be way too fancy with the pattern; there are some truly unnecessary instructions in there and two years ago, I didn’t ask myself if there was an easier way! I’ve updated it. This is a much simpler version of that bag yet it pretty much looks the same. Here it is…

Pop to YouTube HERE or continue reading for the written pattern. Cheers.

Notes:

  • 3mm hook
  • 1x50g ball cotton dk such as DMC Natura Just Cotton (155m/170yds) (or Rico Essentials dk works well but it’s slightly less meterage so you might want to knock off a round of the main body, just in case)
  • The 3ch at the beginning of the first 4 rounds count as a UK tr/ US dc
  • If you have loose tension, it would be better to go down to a 2.5mm hook
  • The pattern is written in UK terms – where it says “dc”, that’s a US sc and a “tr” is a US dc. So htr is hdc! Easy peasy.
  • No turns are made when making the main body of the bag.

Pattern:

Start with a magic ring (or ch4 and join with a slip stitch).

Round 1: 3ch, 11tr into ring. Join to third ch of initial 3ch with a slip stitch, pull the magic ring to close. [12st]

Round 2: 3ch, 1tr into same stitch, 2tr into each stitch, join to third ch of initial 3 ch with a slip stitch. [24st]

Round 3: 3ch, 1tr in same st, 1 tr in next st, *2tr in next stitch, 1 tr in next; rep from * around. [36st]

Round 4: 3ch, 1 tr in same st, 1tr in next 2st, *2tr in next st, 1tr in next 2st; rep from * around. [48st]

Round 5: 1ch, 1dc in same st. *ch3, miss 1 stitch, 1dc in next; rep from * around until the second to last stitch. At this point, ch1 and make a half tr into beginning dc. (Have a look at the chart above to see how to join rounds.  Placing a stitch marker on the last stitch of each row from here will help enormously) [24 chain spaces].

Round 6: *4ch, 1dc in next ch sp; rep from * around until second to last ch sp, 2ch, 1htr into the top of the last st of the previous round (ie, into the top of the htr of previous round).

Round 7: *5ch, 1dc in next ch sp; rep from * around until second to last ch sp, 2ch, 1tr into the top of the last st of the previous round.

Round 8: *6ch, 1dc in next ch sp; rep from * around until second to last ch sp, 3ch, tr into the top of the last st of the previous round.

Round 9: *7ch, 1dc in next ch sp; rep from * around until second to last ch sp, 3ch, 1double tr into the top of the last st of the previous round.

Round 10 -25:  Repeat Round 9

Round 26: Repeat round 8

Round 27: Repeat round 7

Round 28: 1ch, 1dc in same stitch, 2dc in space, 1dc in dc, *4dc in each ch sp, 1 dc in top of each dc of previous round; rep from *,  2dc in last sp, ss to join to 1st dc [120]

Round 29-30: 1ch, 1 dc in same space, dc around, ss to join.

Handle Stage

Row 1: 1ch, 1dc in same space, 1 dc in next 6st, turn [7]

Row 2: 1ch, 1dc along the next 7 stitches, turn [7]

Repeat Row 2 until desired handle length or when nearing the end of the yarn (I made my handle approx 18″).

Turn your bag inside out. To attach the handle to the other side of the bag, count how many stitches are around the top of the bag. I had 120 stitches. You want your handles evenly spaced, I counted 53 stitches along from the right side of my handle and the next stitch (see pic below) was where I started to attach the other end of the handle. Make sure there are no twists!

The hook should be on the right hand side. If it isn’t, make another row or take one away. Insert hook through first stitch on handle and the chosen stitch on the other side of the bag, yarn over and pull through all loops/stitches. Repeat for the last 6 stitches. Fasten off and sew ends in securely.

This pattern has been designed by me and is for your personal use only. Please visit my Ravelry store for more patterns! Thank you.

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Hotchpotch Granny Purse.

I’ve decided that this will be called the Hotchpotch Granny purse, it fits the bill quite nicely. A hotchpotch of leftover scraps makes the perfect crochet stashbuster, don’t you think?!

I’ve filmed this as a video tutorial over on YouTube rather than write up a pattern [pop over to watch HERE]. I cover the magic knot, making up the granny stripes and then lining it too. All in eighteen minutes! I also recommend you visit my zip video too [it’s HERE]. If you’ve never put a zip in your crochet before it might well prove useful.

You can use any yarn, along with your favourite corresponding hook size but there pretty much are no rules to this. Ok, there’s one rule: you need multiples of 3 plus 1 for the starting chain. Even if you’re a stitch or two out then I’m sure you can fudge it. Crochet is very forgiving.

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Some More Crochet Easter Eggs

Am I too early for Easter shenanigans? Eh, I don’t think so. Do you remember the pretty little crochet Easter eggs from a couple of years ago? They’ve gone and got themselves some new mates!

A couple of weeks ago I got an email from Hobbycraft asking if I was interested in trying some yarn so that I could tell you about it.  Seeing as spring is on the way I thought it would be a nice idea to choose some yarn to make my amigurumi Easter eggs with. However, I didn’t want more eggs of the same size so I’ve upped my game. I’ve gone large.

This is the stuff I decided to try, The Women’s Institute acrylic dk. I wanted big eggs this time so I also chose the Soft & Chunky in cream, which is an acrylic mix and has 30% merino. It’s lovely stuff to work with, I think merino is my favourite yarn in the world at the moment. I got the dk colours to decorate the eggs with.

With two 100gram balls of the chunky cream, you can make three small eggs and one large. I weighed them before I added the embellishments and a small one was 27 grams whilst the large was 89 grams. It’s exactly the same pattern, I just doubled up on yarn for the biggy.

I’ve not used this yarn before but I have used plenty of other dk acrylics. Mostly I’m left unimpressed and I have a thing where I don’t like mixing my brands together because the quality varies so much. Usually they don’t pass muster but I don’t think I’d have any qualms about mixing this with the likes of Stylecraft Special or Paintbox  (both of which, are excellent to work with). This is one of the good ones. I have quite a bit of the dk left so I might make blanket along with some other brands to really get a good feel for it (but not anytime soon as I have got a massive list of other projects to do! Bah).

Anyway, on to the pattern…

Eeehh, look at the family all together!

This pattern can be used with any weight of yarn, just make sure you use a hook size that will achieve nice, tight stitches (ie go down a couple of sizes than is recommended).

Notes and things you need:

  • The Women’s Institute Premium Acrylic Yarn DK in Yellow, Lime, Teal, Pink and Light Pink.
  • The Women’s Institute Soft & Chunky in Cream x2 100g gram balls. This amount makes 1 large and three  small eggs.
  • Polyfibre fill stuffing
  • Large eye darning needle
  • Fading ink pen (optional) – it helps to draw out where to put the flowers and leaves before you make the stitches.
  • For the small egg (approx 11cm tall) use the 4.5mm hook.  For the large egg (approx 17cm tall) use the 7mm hook and two strands of the chunky held together.
  • Use two strands of the dk together for embroidering the large egg.
  • US terms are used in the pattern

This pattern below is also found on my original blog post HERE. And last year I recorded a video tutorial showing how to make and embroider the eggs, which is HERE over on my YouTube channel!

Amigurumi Easter Egg.

Round 1: 6sc into a Magic Ring.

Round 2: 1 Inc in each stitch around. [12].

Round 3: 1 sc in next stitch, 1 inc in next. Repeat around [18].

Round 4: Sc around. [18]

Round 5: 1sc in next 2 st, 1 inc in next. Repeat around. [24].

Round 6-7: Sc around [24]

Round 8: 1 sc in next 3 st, 1 inc in next. Repeat around [30].

Round 9-15: Sc around. [30]

Round 16: 1 sc in next 3 st, 1 dec. Repeat around. [24].

Round 17: 1 sc in next 2 st, 1 dec. Repeat around. [18].

Round 18: 1sc in next st, 1 dec. Repeat around [12].

Fasten off leaving a long tail, 40cm should be plenty.  Add embroidered flowers using simple stitches. French knots make the flower centres and the chain stitch makes petals, leaves and stems. Stuff firmly. To close the egg, thread through the front loops and pull tight to gather the stitches together. Stitch in and out a few times to fully secure and then snip the end neatly.

Please do let me know if you make some, I really would love to see. They make such cute spring decorations and you could even tie pretty ribbon through the top to hang them places!

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Happy Easter! X

Another Granny Chevron Cowl! Pattern & Tutorial.

Fancy a very quick and easy crochet project? Last summer I designed and made a fluffy chevron cowl (see pic below). Yesterday I made a smaller, non fluffy version. I made it when I was thinking about all things granny (I couldn’t wait for the Granny CAL! I just couldn’t!). This morning I filmed a short tutorial too. It’s now up on YouTube if you want to go and have a look!

You can find the original pattern Here. I made the new one a bit smaller as I was restricted by the amount of yarn I had: 200 grams of chunky alpaca/mulberry silk stuff I found for £8 a skein from EYF last year. The (impulsively bought) yarn had been sat waiting for nearly a year and I had no real idea about what to do with it for ages. Funny how something can jump out at you after all that time.

Righty, some details.

  • I used a 6mm hook for my chunky yarn.
  • The yarn I used was only 92 metres per 100g. I think other chunky yarns are usually a bit more than that. I used almost every bit so if you don’t have at least 184 meters of chunky then you might not make it to the end.
  • It measures approx 32×32 cm (12.5×12.5 inches). That’s a circumference of 64cm.
  • I chained 47 to begin, this gives you a total of 14 clusters per row
  • To make it bigger or smaller, add or subtract 6. That’s enough for a cluster for each side.
  • The pattern is written in UK terms. The video uses both UK and US terms but essentially all you need to know is that a UK treble is a US double.
  • 3tr = cluster.

Pattern:

Chain 47.

Row 1: 3tr in 7th from hook, (miss 2 st, 3tr in next) six times, ch2, 3tr in next st, (miss 2 st, 3tr) six times, miss 2 st, 1 tr in last st. Turn.

Row 2: Ch3, (3tr in space between clusters) six times, (3tr, ch2, 3tr) in 2 chain space, (3tr in space between clusters) six times, 1tr in last st of row. Turn

Row 3 – 29: Rep row 2, changing colour every five rows.

Row 30: As row 2 but slip stitch to join to Row 1 between each cluster. Fasten off and sew in ends.

I hope you like it. I promise it’s super easy to make and can be made in a couple of hours (maybe less, I didn’t time it).

Jeepers, I’m not wearing make up on me peepers. Again!

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Crochet Granny Stripe Scarf. Free Pattern

Here it is, a super simple yet surprisingly effective granny stripe scarf (I’m all over crochet colour block stuff at the moment). My arm doesn’t stretch far enough to allow all the scarf to get in on the action I’m afraid but I do show it off a bit more in Episode 20 of my crochet podcast. I shan’t dilly dally, it’s the pattern you’re after isn’t it?! Here goes…

You will need around 350g dk yarn, a 4mm hook and marginal approximations of brain power. I used Drops Lima: 2x dark grey mix, 2x powder pink, 3x dark blue. I’m not sure it’s the best idea to use something that’s not machine washable, maybe I should have gone for the super wash merino…

If you wanted to, you could go down a hook size for the ribbing, I did (you can see the effect in the above photo). However, it isn’t necessary and I sort of wish I hadn’t.

  • Multiples of three are what’s needed. Chain as many as you like, I chained 54.
  • OK, this is the (sort of) tricky bit but it is important. It will make one teeny little difference depending on whether you have an even or odd number of multiples, it will determine whether you land on a Front Post st or a Back Post st on the second to last stitch of the row. It really doesn’t matter but it will change what you work first on the next row. All you have to remember is to work a BP in an FP and an FP in a BP. That’s what creates the rib effect.
  • UK terms are used here but I use both in the video. A UK treble is a US double.
  • I changed colour after I ran out of each ball.  I counted to double check that the end mirrored the beginning (you never know, your tension might change a bit).
  • Go here to check out the YouTube tutorial

Row 1. 1 tr in 4th ch from hook, 1tr along, turn. For neatness, work in the back bumps of the chain.

Row 2: Chain 3 (counts a first stitch), *1BP, 1FP; rep from * to second to last st. 1 tr in last st, turn (please read notes about  BP & FP).

Row 3-8: Rep row 2 making BPs & FPs accordingly, turn

Row 9: (1dc, 1ch, 1tr) in first st, *miss 2st, 3tr in next st; rep from * finishing with 2tr in the end st, turn.

Row 10: (1dc, 1ch) in first st, *3tr in next space between clusters; rep from * to end, finish with 1tr in last st, turn.

Row 11: (1dc, 1ch, 1tr) in first st, *3tr between each cluster; rep from * to end, finish with two tr in last st, turn.

Repeat rows 10 & 11 until you’re happy with the length. End on Row 11.

Row 12. Chain 3, 1tr in each st along to end, turn.

Row 13-19. Rep row 2 (remember what I said in the notes!!). Fasten off and sew in ends.

Check out the quick tutorial to see exactly where those BP and FP stitches go! Thanks ever so much.

Tell me when you’ve made one. Here I am on Instagram.  #grannystripescarf  #zeensandroger or add it to Ravelry!

This scarf was inspired by the colour block jumper by cleck heaton, which I love! My scarf is a free pattern, you’re welcome to make as many as you like but please let people know where you got the pattern from. No, you can’t reproduce the pattern, or sell it. Nor can you pretend it is yours. It stings when people claim your things as their own. And it ain’t legal!

Don’t forget to come and say hi!! x

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Crochet Christmas Bauble. Free Pattern & Tutorial!!

Christmas is pretty much just around the corner, honestly, it’ll be here before you know it. I’ve noticed this year that crochet baubles are all the rage, so I’ve had a go at my own simple pattern. I’ve made a tutorial for YouTube too, so if that’s more your thing then do jump across to my YouTube channel… Here is where you’ll find the crochet bauble video!

Things you need:

-6cm (diameter) baubles. Mine are from Sainsbury’s but I bought similar from Wilko’s last year.

-3mm hook

-DK cotton in different colours. I’ve tried many brands and they’re all good: Paintbox, Drops,  Dmc Natura, Stylecraft Classique etc

Notes:

  • Fasten off (FO) after each round and join the new colour with a ss just to the right of where you fastened off.
  • If you want to avoid sewing in most ends, crochet over them as you go!
  • UK terms are used in the written pattern, I try to use both in the video.

Pattern – make 2

Begin with a Magic Circle (or ch4 and join with a slip stitch).

  1. Ch1, 1tr,ch1, *tr2tog, ch1* rep from *to* 5 times.  [6 “petals”] Join with a ss to the top of the first petal.
  2. (Ch2, 1tr, ch1, tr2tog, ch1) in same space, (tr2tog, ch1, tr2tog, ch1) in each 1 ch sp. [12 “petals”]. Join with a ss to the top of the first petal.
  3. Ch3, 2tr in first ch sp, 3tr in each ch sp around. Join to top of the ch3. [12 clusters]
  4. Ch2, 1htr in each st around. [36]
  5. Ch1, 1dc in each st around. Join with ss.

Make two halves. Sew in the first and last ends. Do not FO after round 5 on the second half. Place both halves together, right sides out and ss together, facing loops only. Just over half way, wriggle the bauble into its jacket and continue to ss together. This can be fiddly but it’s worth it! Sew in last end, using it to tidy around the hanging bit if you need to. Make several!!

Fancy giving it a go?! Please do give me a shout if you have found the pattern/tutorial useful. A thumbs up on YouTube helps too, I understand it gets more reach or some such thing. Thank you very much!

By the way, please do go ahead and share a link to this pattern. Sharing is truly marvellous! But I ask ( really rather nicely, please, thank you, please) that you credit Zeens and Roger if you do. Just don’t rewrite it and pretend that it’s your own. I hate that. If that’s you, go and design your own bauble. Thank you ever so much.

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Rainbow Edged Granny Square

I wanted to call this Easy Granny and her Rainbow Edge but I thought it sounded a bit saucy. It’s now just a Rainbow Edged Granny Square. A very traditional sort of crochet blanket but one that seems to be quite popular at the moment. Rainbows are in! I posted the above picture on Instagram yesterday and the response was really positive. There were loads of lovely comments and that surprised me. I love that the simple granny square gets so much attention.

Some details then.

It measures around 89cm (35″), plenty big enough for a baby blanket that’ll see  you through to toddler years.

When I was making the granny square I turned it every round to prevent a twist. I toyed with doing that for the rainbow border but in the end I decided I wanted all the colours to have a “right” side. I joined each rainbow colour in opposite corners, again to avoid the dreaded twist. (I talk about this in more detail in episodes 10 and 11 of the podcast)

I used Stylecraft Special DK. There are two whole balls of Cream for the main body, which as you’ve probably guessed is literally just your standard granny. And for the border (rows of UK trebles) it was probably half a ball of each of the following: Lipstick, Spice, Citron, Pistachio, Kelly, Aster, Lobelia, Violet and Fuchsia. A bit more for the latter as I went round twice with it.

The border is taken from Attic 24, it’s the bobble shell edging but I add 3 slip stitches between each bobble. I’ve used it a few times for blankets and I really like the simplicity of it. I don’t always think it’s necessary to have a majorly fancy border, especially when there’s a shed tonne of colour going on.

Mistakes. There are a couple!  Nothing that would jump out at a non-crocheter but I know that they’re there. Probably my biggest bungle was the indecision about the corners. When it came to the border I did a few rounds of (3tr, ch2, 3tr). It was starting to look bunchy and rather than frog back the three or four rows I’d done I just started making it (2tr, ch2, 2tr). Just that small change made me feel a bit better about how it looked. There are a couple of other minor things but I’m just not going to tell anyone. Is that bad?!

If you’re new to crochet then I also have a video on YouTube to accompany this “pattern” Please do go and have a look for more help about how the granny square is put together.

Below are some more pictures, I took a whole load! I’d love to see if you make one too. You can always use #zeensandroger if you’re over on IG. Cheers. X

And remember, although it’s “just” a classic Granny, which I cannot claim as my design, the combination of elements I have put together are indeed my design. If you make a blanket, please credit me. Thank you.

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Connie’s Blanket. A Colourful Crochet Granny.

It feels like this pretty crochet granny blanket has been in the making for aaaaggess. Relatively speaking that’s probably not true. I started it because I had leftovers from the Crazy Chevron blanket I made back in February. Trying (unsuccessfully) to reduce the stash has been the aim for quite a while. For this chap, a few colours were swapped depending on what there was most of in my “collection”. I only bought two balls extra.

If you watch my crochet podcast you’ll have heard me go on about this in nearly every single episode! I thought you guys might be interested in a blog post too and it’s a good idea to have all the info in one place. So here we are!

This colourful creation is now called Connie’s Blanket. I didn’t know when I started, that it would end up as a birthday present but at some stage or other it decided (not me), that that was what it was!

Connie’s Blanket is made up of 130 squares (10×13), which were Joined As You Go. The pattern and construction are similar to a blanket I made a few years ago. That one is nattily entitled Crochet Circles in a Square blanket. That blog post has links for all you need if you’re going to make a blanket like this. I’ll break it down here too…

Crochet Circle pattern.  The difference in Connie’s blanket is that I used a magic ring to start each circle and I added no chains between the trebs (US dc’s) of the first round. Oh, and no double trebles on the joining round, just some trebs.

Attic 24’s Join As You Go tutorial

Zeens and Roger on YouTube, pick an and episode, any episode… I’ll probs be talking about it!

I used Stylecraft Special DK in the following colours: Duck Egg, Spring, Fondant, Fuschia, Shrimp, Lobelia, Apricot, Grey, Kelly, Cloud, Mustard, Wisteria,

I made all the inner circles first (well, most of them – I kept adding more when I saw I had enough yarn for more rows), then evenly distributed those between the shades. I haven’t checked but I reckon they’re all unique.

The border is dead simple. Three rounds of Grannies, 1 row of trebles and a scallop edge. To jazz up the edge a bit more I ended up doing this: Starting in a dip: *(ch2, 1dc after next treble) x4, ch2, 1ss in the dip between scallops; rep from *. I think that’s right but give me a shout if it’s weird!

And that’s pretty much it. Blankets like these are one of my favourite things to crochet. I don’t know why, they just are! What about you? How do you get on with granny blankets?! I know some people think they’re naff and old fashioned but I can’t help but love em!

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Phildar Phil Flocon Review with Chevron Cowl Pattern!

I was contacted by HobbyCraft a few weeks ago, Emily [she deals with the knit/crochet side of things there – check out @knitcraftHQ on IG] thought I’d be interested in trying out some yarn for them.  As you know, I have an inability to refuse free stuff so I was very happy to take a few balls off their hands! I was given a choice of any yarn from their Phildar range. I have a feeling that all things floof will get pretty popular in the coming months (Yep, I’ve been saying that since last year when I tried out Wool and the Gang’s Take Care Mohair). I need to do my bit in fulfilling this prediction so I chose Phildar Phil Flocon. It’s not mohair but it’s just as fluffy.

It’s a blend of all sorts but usually if I see alpaca on the label, I’m sold. I love anything with alpaca in it. This yarn is alpaca, wool, acrylic and polymide and it has a yummy woolly smell.

Did you know that Flocon can mean both flock as in wool (think flock wallpaper) and flake, as in snowflake! It’s wool and looks like fluffy snow!! Brilliant!

I had lots of fun working with it. From experience I know that this isn’t yarn you want to frog. Whatever I made had to be super simple. I didn’t want to make mistakes and have to waste hours with failed rescue attempts. I decided on a cowl, you can’t get much more basic than that. I love the result, it’s fab. It is also super quick to work up. The fluffy nature of the yarn means it comes out quite chunky. Chunky is excellent, chunky means less work as far as I’m concerned!

Because I got the yarn for free and because it’s a super easy crochet design I thought it’d be a nice idea to pop up the pattern for free too. Whilst you’re here, please do bear in mind that on the next episode of my podcast/vlog I’ll be doing a Giveway for my Phildar dregs. How appealing does that sound!!? Ok, sorry, not dregs. I have two full balls that I didn’t use and would love to pass it on. Keep an eye out for Episode 10, which is due to come out on the 21st July.

Sooo, fancy and warm and cosy crochet cowl for winter (a winter that’s ages away!)? Here’s the pattern…

You’ll need Phildar Flocon: 2x Creme, 2x Glacon and a 6.5mm hook.

Pattern is written in UK terms. 3tr=cluster.

Chain 65.

Row 1: 3tr in 7th from hook. (skip 2 st, 3tr in next) nine times. Ch2, 3tr in next st, (skip 2 st, 3tr) nine times. Skip 2 st, 1 tr in last st. Turn.

Row 2: Ch3. 3tr in space between clusters, nine times. (3tr, ch2, 3tr) in 2 chain space. 3tr in space between clusters, nine times. 1tr in last st of row. Turn

Row 3 – 35: Rep row 2, changing colour every six rows.

Row 36: As row 2 but slip stitch to join to Row 1 between each cluster. (Check the pics below to see the join) Fasten off and sew in ends.

I wish I’d worn eye make up the day I took this!

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By the way, this pattern belongs to me, please don’t publish it, pinch it, or do anything with it other than use it for your own personal fun. Give me a shout if you want to talk about that. Thanks ever so much. X

 

 

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